Spring Service Tips and Watering Recommendations

From the April 2021 Newsletter:
It’s officially spring, which means irrigation time is here! It’s our second watering season in a row of drier and warmer conditions, and we’re in a Drought Watch. While it’s important to start watering plants now, don’t overdo it. Your monthly usage should only be two to four times higher than it is in the winter season. Meanwhile, do your best to avoid water waste. Runoff from over-watering is a big culprit, but making updates to your irrigation system can improve efficiency. Generous rebates are available!

For additional landscaping tips and to subscribe to the newsletter, visit the 505Outside website.

Plant Selection of the Month

Crocus:

Exposure: Sun/Shade
Water: Medium
Height and Spread: 6″ x 6″
Blooming Season: Spring
Description: 
The Crocus is a brilliant addition to any landscape. It is one of the earliest bulbs to arrive and provides the first color to your landscape. The Crocus fits well in most landscapes because it can be found in various colors and sizes. It is easy to grow and care for and will return the following spring. 

Get Winter Irrigation and Landscaping Tips from the ABCWUA

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If you are wondering how much to water your trees during abnormally dry winter, Water Authority’s landscape experts can help answer this question and other landscape and irrigation questions. The Water Authority offers FREE personalized email consultations on topics related to sustainable, desert friendly landscaping and irrigation practices. Simply e-mail: AskAnExpert@abcwua.org and include pictures of your yard, plants and irrigation system when sending in questions.

Landscape Maintenance

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A NEW Landscape Maintenance contract was put out for bid in February.  Previous contracts had the maintenance being done on a five-week rotation.  Five weeks proved to be too long between treatments.  Weeds were large and plentiful and shrubs grew out over the sidewalks.  The new contract calls for a three-week rotation during the growing season (March through October) and a five-week rotation during the non-growing season (November to February).  Based upon this summer’s results, three weeks provides ample time for the crew to address the weeds and shrubs and keep the HOA looking good.  With the weeds and shrubs not growing during the winter, the crew should be able to maintain the property on the five-week schedule with less cost to the HOA.  

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